Snapper Quota change

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Re: Snapper Quota change

Postby AndrewRawlingson » Thu Aug 08, 2013 8:21 pm

That's true. I always forget about that.
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Re: Snapper Quota change

Postby binklebonk » Fri Aug 09, 2013 9:11 am

Phantom Menace wrote:Some of these discussions with folks from other cultures have got me thinking about the best use of the fish I catch and I am slowly having a crack at changing my habits - moving away from the "fillet and toss" approach to ones that make a better use of the resource.


Nice one. It's always a slow process changing well ingrained habits.
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Re: Snapper Quota change

Postby Phantom Menace » Fri Aug 09, 2013 1:46 pm

binklebonk wrote:
Phantom Menace wrote:Some of these discussions with folks from other cultures have got me thinking about the best use of the fish I catch and I am slowly having a crack at changing my habits - moving away from the "fillet and toss" approach to ones that make a better use of the resource.


Nice one. It's always a slow process changing well ingrained habits.


Thanks. The active selection part of spearfishing allows me to consider things before I pull the trigger and therefore spread my impact across a range of species more easily. This also results in various size fish being taken (depending on the species) and this influences the methods used to process/consume the catch.

Cooking whole, smoking and soup/broth making are good ways. Smoked wings from a kingfish, smoked fish frames (if I have the space in the little smoker) are great and my father makes a mean fish soup from snapper and kingfish heads.

BTW my spearfishing has minimal impact on snapper stocks - they are a hard fish to get consistently!!
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Re: Snapper Quota change

Postby divepirate » Fri Aug 09, 2013 4:51 pm

With trout, as with snapper, the spawning time is a time when the most fish can be caught in the shortest time period.

The growing kowledgebase and the use if electronics has led to pinpointing and targeting by both commercial and rec alike.

If the fish were allowed to spawn and return to the ocean and spread out perhaps this would be one of the ways of I creasing the numbers.

Also a change of mindset from one which seems to be take all you can get to 'take only what you need' and a change from 'catch the most catch the biggest' etc.

This is compounded by fishing shows, where the fishermen are taking all they can, taking the biggest etc.
(This has decreased though in the last year).
It is nice to see fish being returned to the water by those that are effectively 'professional' fishermen.
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Re: Snapper Quota change

Postby Ali Perkins » Sun Aug 11, 2013 3:30 am

My understanding is that spawning aggregations of snapper are targeted by commercial and recreational fishermen.

I just received the Forest & Bird Best fish guide 2013-2014 (it takes a while to get mail in Mexico!) and I see that Snapper is sitting in the red zone, second to bottom above Orange Roughy. So I guess the only sustainable way to eat snapper now is to catch them yourself.

http://www.bestfishguide.org.nz/
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Re: Snapper Quota change

Postby Ali Perkins » Sun Aug 11, 2013 4:43 am

There is a Best fish guide app available for iPhones and Android.
http://www.bestfishguide.org.nz/

Snapper
Ranking: E (Red - Worst Choice)

Alternative Choice: Trevally or Kingfish

Description: A slow growing, long-lived (up to 60 years) member of the sea bream family, snapper is one of largest and most valuable coastal fisheries in New Zealand. It is common around the North Island and upper South Island and is mainly caught by bottom longlining or trawling operations, generally at depths of 10-100 metres. Jointly with oreos/deepwater dory, and southern bluefin tuna, snapper have the second worst ecological ranking on the Best Fish Guide of any commercial fishery in New Zealand.

Ecological concerns: The depleted status of the stocks (primarily as a result of historical depletion), the management of two stocks as one, the uncertainty in stock assessments for some areas and the lack of a management plan. As snapper are also a common target for recreational fishing, a sector in which there is limited to no assessment of catch, the impacts of the combined recreational and commercial catches are also of concern.

The impacts of bottom trawling, the bycatch of seabirds in the longline fishery (including the globally threatened black petrel) and the possible bycatch of the critically endangered Maui’s dolphin in the trawl fishery are other concerns. Restrictions on trawling introduced in May 2008 have reduced the risk of catching Maui’s dolphins. However, offshore fishing outside the closed areas still poses a risk plus, pending the decision of a high court challenge, the risk may return to inshore coastal waters if regulations are dropped.

http://www.forestandbird.org.nz/what-we-do/publications/-best-fish-guide-/snapper
Full ecological assessment also available on the website.
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Re: Snapper Quota change

Postby Phantom Menace » Thu Sep 19, 2013 8:40 am

Link to the MPI SNA1 decision:
http://www.fish.govt.nz/en-nz/Consultations/SNA1+management+decision.htm

Below is my summary of this (in addition to the 30cm size minimum and 7 snapper daily bag limit which I don't have a problem with apart from thinking that maybe it did not go far enough - in light of the need to rebuild stock levels).

* recognition of the high rec value of SNA1 (whether you see this as "lip service" or not - it is there)
* recognition of the concerns over wastage and dumping
* need for a strategy to ensure long-term health of the fishery
* definition of a "future direction" of 50:50 split between comm and rec (which many may or may not view as a positive but to me it is)
* Longterm strategy to be developed by a "multi sector action group" which is to be set-up this year (time to get the right people onto this group)
* Camera and/or observer coverage on trawl vessels (cost split between crown and comms)
* Vessel monitoring systems - to know where comms are 100% of the time
* Tagging survey - better info on fishery health
* and it mentions the existing development of new trawl gear - although this has been underway for a while so a long bow to draw to say it is part of this decision but at least it is underway.
* Move on rule - when catching too many juveniles
* Introduction of reporting for all catch under the comm MLS
* Long line max size limit

IMO this is several steps forward from the position of a few months ago. The changes above should result in greater compliance with existing comm regulations and plugging some of the holes in the current data set - particularly the wastage of sub-25cm snapper and the overall health of the snapper fishery.

Yes, comms can take 25cm snapper but the TACC remains at the same point at the moment so they won't be hoovering up all the snapper in the near future. The "future direction" to a 50:50 split (if it is adhered to) should look after that for a while.
On the cost to comms front it looks like MPI are suggesting:
* $0.5 - $1million pa for ongoing data processing (from cameras and observers) - this is the comms 50%
* $600,000 for vessel monitoring systems
* $3.5 million for the tagging survey (how much per year?? I dunno)
* development of new gear $26million - but I think I read somewhere else on the MPI site that the tech would be licensed / sold once developed so they should get some return from it
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Re: Snapper Quota change

Postby AndrewRawlingson » Thu Sep 19, 2013 3:35 pm

I have no problem with the reduction in recreational bag limit and would like to have seen it reduced further. That statement would get me lynched on the NZ fishing forums. Although there are some changes afoot in the way commercials operate, I don't believe there is anything substantive to stop the disgusting waste of juvenile fish and unwanted species. Everything should be landed and the biomass taken off quotas, that would focus the mind of the commercial operators on fishing methods.
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Re: Snapper Quota change

Postby divepirate » Fri Sep 20, 2013 1:16 pm

Phantom Menace wrote:Link to the MPI SNA1 decision:
http://www.fish.govt.nz/en-nz/Consultations/SNA1+management+decision.htm

Yes, comms can take 25cm snapper but the TACC remains at the same point at the moment so they won't be hoovering up all the snapper in the near future. The "future direction" to a 50:50 split (if it is adhered to) should look after that for a while.
On the cost to comms front it looks like MPI are suggesting:
* $0.5 - $1million pa for ongoing data processing (from cameras and observers) - this is the comms 50%
* $600,000 for vessel monitoring systems
* $3.5 million for the tagging survey (how much per year?? I dunno)
* development of new gear $26million - but I think I read somewhere else on the MPI site that the tech would be licensed / sold once developed so they should get some return from it


<podium> So, the Govt does it again, one rule for some and one for others..
All that will happen is the smaller fish will be hauled by trawlers, who I have seen 300m from the coastline at the border of a marine reserve tearing the 10m bottom apart with their nets.
And nice to see the Govt who has sold NZ's power assets (due to not wanting to be involved in profit making) creating ways that they can achieve a return... (sic)...
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